Warm Indian-Spiced Vegetable Curry

Measurements and abundance

I have a confession to make.

I’m not a fan of recipes. Eek!

I grew up watching my mom – who was a cook by trade – toss spices and salt into 60 litre pots, by hand. Her measuring system was a combination of eye tracking, prayer and instinct. And so my siblings I learnt to do the same.

Being a specific science, and one I’ve not yet mastered, I always follow measurements closely when it comes to baking. Perhaps even more so now, that I’ve endeavoured to pave my way through healthier, vegan baking. However, when trying a new savoury dish, I usually browse over the ingredients and quantities of a recipe, and taste and feel my way through the rest of the process. In addition to my mother’s measuring habits, I grew up with the notion of abundance: a word I’ve selected very carefully.

Abundance is not the same as excessive. We were not reared to be excessive. But there was always more than enough. Enough for everyone to eat their fill. Enough to share with others, and enough for the blessing of some leftovers. Abundance is not the same as greed or indulgence, yet it’s something I struggle with a bit now, given that our modern society is largely focused on the measurement of things.

We’ve developed a culture of weighing portions and calorie counting, which I just cannot seem to adjust to. I do care about what and how much I eat, and I do think that portion control is important. However, I think that the enjoyment of food and the use of food to bring people together is equally important.

Is there a better way to do just that, than with an Indian-spiced curry?

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The person behind the curry

You can tell a lot about a person by tasting their curry. 😉

Is that a saying yet? An Indian expression, perhaps? I say it jokingly, but I think there’s some truth to it. I find curry to be a very personal dish, because it’s so sensitive to one’s own taste. A good curry is the result of not only the ‘right’ proportions of spice, but more particularly, your choice of curry spice. It’s the part of the curry that indicates your personal taste, long before the mildness or spiciness of the dish does.

This curry recipe uses common, fragrant Indian spices like cumin, stick cinnamon and cardomom.

It is spicy, yet mild, and very flavourful. It is warm, comforting, and for me, it tastes like home. Pair it with coriander rice for a satisfying meal, that won’t weigh you down. I deliberately omitted a concentrated protein from this recipe, and I find that it’s appropriately combined, with regard to food combining principles. As a result, it’s easy on the digestive system.

For bulk, I’ve added potatoes and carrots. It’s a great base to start with. Feel free to add whichever vegetables you have at hand. Bear in mind that different vegetables require different cooking times, so take care in adding them to the cooking process at appropriate times, lest you end up with some pulpy vegetables.

Carrots and potatoes take the longest time.

Cruciferous vegetables like cauliflower and broccoli, which are great additions,  cook a lot quicker and should be added when the potatoes are almost ready.

Enjoy experimenting with curry, as it’s a forgivable dish. (Unless you’ve been a bit heavy handed with some cayenne pepper! hehe)

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Here’s wishing you an abundance. 

xx

 

 

 

Print Recipe
Warm Indian-Spiced Vegetable Curry
Try this warm, Indian-spiced vegetable curry for dinner tonight, using the vegetables already in your pantry. It's sure to become a staple in your home!
Course Main Dish
Cuisine Indian
Prep Time 20 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Spices and other seasoning
Vegetables
Course Main Dish
Cuisine Indian
Prep Time 20 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Spices and other seasoning
Vegetables
Instructions
  1. In a medium, heated pot, combine the oil, stick cinnamon and cardamom. When the oil has been heated, add the onion, garlic and ginger.
  2. Once the onion has been browned, add the tomatoes and allow to cook until soft.
  3. Add the potatoes, carrots, stock and spice to the pot. Allow to cook on medium-high heat for 30 minutes or so.
  4. When the potatoes and carrots are almost ready, add the zucchini and broccoli to the pot. Simmer until all the vegetables cooked through, but still firm.
  5. Garnish with coriander and serve. This dish pairs well with our fragrant coriander rice (recipe can be found in the index), or freshly prepared roti or chapati.

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